Fukushima and my health

Day 14.

I’ve been undergoing a cleanse for the last 12 days. Sugars, starches, gluten, dairy, alcohol – GONE. Let’s just say, it’s been, um, interesting.

Since day one I decided I would do an anti-candida diet. Why? Good question. Maybe because my wife did one a few years ago and I thought I could piggy-back off her experience. All I knew was that the awareness around my diet and nutrition was dissipating into the cupboards of chocolate and booze. Truth be told, I’m not that unhealthy. I exercise regularly, drink about 1-2 beers a night, have 2-4 slices of bread a day, and usually top out my evening with some good old SUGAR, sweet beautiful sugar.

So what does this have to do with Fukushima? Well surprisingly, I’ve noticed quite a few parallels since I began my cleanse. Here are just a few:

1) Fukushima happened years ago, yet is still affecting the health of the planet in ways we do not yet understand.

2) Everyone’s got an opinion.

3) It is nearly impossible to get reliable information.

For those of you with the time, interest, and enthusiasm, here are some links to either open your world a bit wider or lock you in the vault of despair. Some of these you may know right away. The more rational ones, I’ve noticed, seem to slip to the bottom of the pile.

http://freedomoutpost.com/2014/01/36-signs-media-lying-fukushima-radiation-affecting-west-coast/

http://deepseanews.com/2013/11/true-facts-about-ocean-radiation-and-the-fukushima-disaster/

http://fukushima-diary.com/

http://enenews.com/

http://www.theinertia.com/environment/fukushima-maybe-it-isnt-the-end-of-the-world/

Back to the candida cleanse – OK. So if I’m going to do this thing I just as well start informing myself. I’ve found books written by medical professionals, spent hours online studying countless websites, and spoken with numerous friends and acquaintances. The result? I still have no idea what I can and cannot eat.

Carrot juice is acceptable first thing in the morning – the fact that carrot juice tastes good should be warning enough.

Mushrooms are medicinal – mushrooms will kill you and your friends in your sleep.

Caffeine is ok – caffeine is a crutch, you are weak, WEAK!

A piece of fruit a day is perfectly fine – fruit is the red-headed step child of candida.

(For those of you with great advice about my diet, no matter how altruistic your intentions are, please respect that I…DON’T…CARE!)

The point of all this is, most of what we learn and rely on comes from sources outside of ourselves. If I am going to figure out what my body needs, I better start listening to it and stop relying on the internet to make my decisions for me.

Fukushima is a bit trickier. No doubt about it, this is a global catastrophe. Every news station, every mayor, every president in every country should be working on solving this problem. So why in the hell can’t the general public get accurate information? For now, that’s a rabbit hole I’m not prepared to go down today. Regardless, no matter how bad the situation is, there are still a few things we can do:

1) Gather as much information as we can from as many different sources as possible.

2) Analyze the information objectively.

3) Stay out of fear.

4) Make rational decisions based on the information we have gathered.

How many people do you know who are ready to move to South America or seal off the cracks in their homes with duct tape? Or better yet, how many people out there are clueless that this is even going on??

Though most of us do not have the time or the means to dedicate our lives to find out the answers, the least we can do is exercise the powers we do have. We have the power to:

1) Use the internet as a tool to spread awareness (without fear) for the purpose of bringing more people into alignment with possible solutions.

2) We can contact our local and state representatives and demand a transparent investigation. How is this situation affecting my local food and water sources?

3) Buy a Geiger counter and create your own outlet of information

4) It’s also not a bad idea to take preventative measures for your own health – seaweed/iodine, buckwheat, bentonite clay, zeolite supplements. Also, a break in Pacific seafood might be wise, though that is debatable.

I hope this perspective is helpful for people. I’m learning that our outer world is a reflection of what’s going on inside. If we want to see change we can agree with, we have to be willing to sacrifice the things that no longer serve us. We always have the potential to create heaven right here at home. But one thing is for certain – no one is going to do it for us.

Diet for World Peace

The world we inherit will reflect the people who dwell upon it.

Potential

 

I have always been a relatively optimistic person. When a challenge presents itself, I am able to see the hurdle for what it is and create appropriate solutions. In today’s world, however, there seem to be more hurdles than I can come to terms with. It is an incredible gift to be alive and living on this planet at this point in history. Never before have we seen the complexities of Gaia like we do now; the internet has shattered all excuses of ignorance – we are all in this shit together.

 

I am often overwhelmed by the problems we face. At times it seems like people don’t care. Facebook reveals that more individuals are concerned with Duck Dynasty than Fukushima. There is no doubt that a well orchestrated agenda is underway to keep us distracted from what is really important. But who is to blame? Governments and corporations are easy scapegoats. Yes, money rules, and those with the most of it make decisions that impact us all. If we are to truly awaken into awareness, then we cannot deny our role in this collective drama.

 

A couple years ago, my partner and I went to Africa to film a documentary called The Sustainability of Self. What is sustainability? Is it aid? Solar panels? Permaculture? All those things are great, but ultimately, it comes back to individual responsibility. How can I berate a system that plunders our planet’s resources when I still drive a car every day? How can I help indigenous tribes in the Amazon if I don’t even know my neighbor’s name? Sustainability is not about water harvesting or car pooling. It is a mindset. It is a philosophy that we live our lives by. The only way we can escape being a victim of this all consuming machine is to take back our own individual power.

 

For the next two months, I will be working on improving the only person I can…a physical cleanse is underway. The concept of addiction is fascinating to me. Who is really in control – us or our habits? If I am to be fully in my power then I cannot be ruled over by that which does not serve me. That means no sugar, no alcohol, no processed foods, along with a whole host of fun things now denied…let’s just say I’ve been putting this cleanse off for over a year. My body, like this planet, is a sacred thing, and I do not deserve what I do not honor. Real change comes from within and if I am going to see the planet I wish to live on, I better start acting like it.

The Sustainability of Self

What defines true sustainability? How can we begin to create sustainability in a world that has such vastly differing views on the subject? If we perceive our external world as “unsustainable” what does this suggest about our own internal landscape? The Sustainability of Self is a documentary that follows two travelers for two years across the world to Ethiopia, and back, seeking insight into a world on the verge of transformation.

The truth behind America’s involvement in Libya

It will not come as a surprise to most of you, that the American media is blatantly biassed. Mainstream media is a disinformation machine. Sadly, this machine has cost the lives of thousands of people.

It is not commonly known by most Americans however that the real reason we went to Libya was not to “liberate” its citizens but rather because Muammar Gaddafi was in the process of changing his nations currency to GOLD. Taking a look on the American dollar bill, we no longer have money supported by gold but rather we carry “legal tender.” The parallels between Libya and Iraq are staggering.

I implore you to watch this video and share it with everyone you can. Critical mass is coming, but we must take action of our own to ensure a global network of intelligent, peaceful, enlightened individuals.

The mindset of sustainability – an emerging education for the collective

My outlook will be different now, there’s no turning back.

I’ve been doing work trade on a permaculture farm for almost a week … and I’m hooked. Perhaps it’s the delicious food I pull right out of the earth, or the abundance of wildlife outside my doorstep, or the fact that the matrix is currently nowhere near my reality. Where I’m at, has something very important to teach me.

Aprovecho, a sustainable learning center, sits on a modest 40 acres in the hills of west central Oregon, outside Cottage Grove. Here, people from all backgrounds come to learn a variety of sustainable practices such as aquaculture, proper water harvesting, practical building design, and even pedal powered technology – ever grind your own wheat with a bicycle?

Before I came, I had only once before experienced permaculture while traveling in Ethiopia. I was staying at a small hostel which had transformed dead earth into a thriving oasis by mimicking nature through sustainable land use design. I watched as the owners took awe-struck villagers through the property, showing them innovative yet simple practices that obviously worked.  It was an incredible experience to witness the children process this new information like thirsty sponges. The term sustainable education sprang to mind.

On the other side of the planet, outside Cottage Grove, OR, Aprovecho has been working as a permaculture education center for over ten years. Ironically, many people who read this article have probably never even heard of permaculture before. But soon, they will. The concept and philosophies of permaculture are catching on fast, and the movement, is becoming a revolution.

The foundation of permaculture relies on the observation of patterns and systems and an understanding that nothing is independent.


This is useful wisdom for an expanding planet. More and more people are beginning to understand that their everyday actions are having great impact on other people halfway across the planet. For those seeking true sustainability, daily micro-management becomes essential. The processes that make up our day must be done consciously if we are to create a healthy future for the individual and the collective, which these days are one and the same.

Sustainable is a tricky word to define, especially in today’s green-market driven economy. Linguistically appealing terms such as all natural or self-sufficient have all but stigmatized historically traditional methods of conservation and practical science. The push for low-impact practices like car-pooling and water conservation have been obvious for years, but today have become synonymous with emotionally charged advertisements for hybrid cars and the monopolization of utility companies. A new earth conscious mind-set from society has been needed for decades, but only recently has our government seen the economic opportunity  to implement/sell these eco-friendly technologies to the public.

Hippies on the other hand have been screaming sustainable practices and “community mentality” since the 1960’s yet have been demonized as out-of-touch, impractical, and idealistic misfits in a consumer driven society. This same consumer driven society has brought us to where we are today, completely out of touch with our natural environment. The majority of us no longer grown our own food or even understand how it gets to our dinner table. The complexity of natural systems and cycles evades the general public. This results in a poor understanding of the earth we were once a part of.

In Oregon, over 90% of old growth forest has been clear cut. This has resulted in a huge explosion of blackberry bushes which grow best in areas with disturbed soil – another reason they are seen so frequently in ditches and vacant lots in towns and cities in the Pacific Northwest. One of my main duties as a work trader at Aprovecho is blackberry maintenance. Long tedious days of clipping, pruning, and de-rooting yield piles upon piles of blackberry vines.

Today, blackberries are considered an invasive species, much like scotch broom, a large yellow-flowered bush that grows throughout the country next to roads and highways. Both plants are soil rejuvenators, providing much needed nitrogen into the damaged soil for re-growth. Yet because of their invasive nature, toxic chemicals are being used to eradicate them, furthering damage to the soil.

Blackberries are but one example of the many problems we face and the impractical solutions we have created for solving them.

Sustainability is a mind-set, an evolving practice that encompasses all aspects of one’s lifestyle. External observation is paramount to understanding what actions we must take and why we must take them.  It’s not simply buying locally, it’s understanding a neighbor’s needs and lending support when possible. Going green isn’t just recycling, it’s rethinking.

Solutions are rarely arrived at before the problem becomes too big. Suddenly, the problem is much too big.

A ballooning global population is no longer upon us, it is us. We now find ourselves looking squarely in the face of some pretty disturbing realities: diminishing food chains, the end of oil as we know it, global drought, and an ever-broadening of the social classes.  As  time and globalization march ever forward, no longer  can we elude responsibility. There are no islands to escape to, save mars.

Aprovecho is the first stop of many. For the next 6 months, my partner and I will be visiting multiple alternative education centers and sustainability  programs in the United States – the end product, a documentary about sustainable education.

As a former educator, I believe that holistic education, above all else, is the foundation for a sustainable society and planet. As we collectively move into a new understanding of humanity’s role on Gaia, we must be certain that our youth are not only understanding this change, but are also spearheading it. New insights in education are being made every day. Teachers are coming forward with innovative new ideas and for a healthy planet to grow, these ideas must be shared. Students must be encouraged to think outside the conventional, because our future will be anything but.

The Evolution of Community

As this time of acceleration brings us and like-minded individuals closer together, we begin the process of what role we have to play in this new global community and what foundations we will build for a successful integration.

I leave you with a brief discussion about community and some of the rolls yet to be analyzed. Enjoy!

You are NOT crazy…

The Fountainhead saved my life, I think.

I was 22, finishing college, and was terrified that I was on the verge of a mental breakdown. Society was in shambles and no one cared! People talked about nonsense, politicians were de-evolving nations, cats and dogs, living together!

But there is always hope in the recognition of self – like looking into the looking-glass of life and meeting someone’s confident gaze that you do in fact exist.

Who is John Galt?

Six years later, against all odds, I have great hope for where the collective is heading. Every day I meet more and more people who have begun to wake up out of the virtual reality that chronic mass delusion has created. For those of us who have taken the challenge of challenging our beliefs about “reality”, there is much in store for us. At this moment I believe, there is an army that is emerging out of a hyperly complex system, deep in the bowels of the collective unconscious. It is a rolling over – it is an uprise of unconsciousness and inaction, it is the creation of co-creation, a separation of the ego and a new formation of new ideas and spiritual awakenings.

I could go on and on… this wasn’t meant to be some dissertation or a call to action. Just a recognition of hope and a recognition of like-minded individuals, that we are not alone, that things are changing, that WE are changing, that evolution is our birthright.

New Reality Consumption

It is no mystery that what we place in our body has a great and profound relationship with our external world.  Just like all living beings, our physical bodies require air, food, and water; it is the quality of these staples that determine our state of health and vitality, as well of course, as our mental state of well-being.

Over time, our thoughts and feelings become affected by the toxins that we indirectly and regularly consume. As our collective consciousness expands, we are beginning to understand that the planet’s state of well-being is in direct relationship with our own. Many of us are retreating back into nature to renew what is inherently ours: a profound connection between the macro and the micro/ a communication between Man and his Cells – a communion between Human and Gaia.

Yesterday was my final day of a week-long raw foods diet. This diet was culminated with a vision quest with the aid of San Pedro Cactus deep in the forests of Washington state. San Pedro grows predominantly in the Andes mountains of South America and just like its North American cousin peyote, it is rich with mescaline and other healing properties. It has been used by shaman for thousands of years. Recently, western doctors, under the guidance of shamanic discipline and technique, have used san pedro to remedy diseases ranging from arthritis to cancer.

On a mental level, san pedro helps us to formulate a more sophisticated perception of reality. Like many true hallucinogens (magic mushrooms, ayahuasca, ibogaine) it guides the user into deeper states of consciousness. As one shaman describes: “San Pedro heals by fundamentally changing our perception of reality – our belief in what is real and possible for us – so we understand our true power and the healing abilities we have. “It shows us reality as it actually is, not how we think it is.”

“It changes what we think of as real so we see the power we humans have: we can manifest whatever we choose – if we believe we can.”

http://finalizations.com/san-pedro-the-miracle-healer.html

There is much taking place of which we are not aware.

Altered states of consciousness (taking san pedro, jumping out of an airplane, meditation, traveling) expand our filters of reality; altered states allow us to take in more information about the world at once. Most of us live under the law of expectation – we go into our day expecting to go to work, expecting to see people in the city, expecting things to happen as they’ve always happened.

Other people however are on their own “expectational adventures” and they use their own reality filters. Their reality is dependent on their beliefs about their own day-to-day life. All of our expectations come from a deeply imbedded idea of who we think we are and how we think we fit in with the rest of the world.

Collective expectations are what we are now currently agreed upon. We agree that our particular culture speaks this particular language, that money is of this value, and that gravity does what gravity is supposed to do. We expect certain things to exist. We expect certain things do not exist.

When we enter into an altered state of consciousness, we begin seeing more than we expect to see.

Multiple realities are happening all around us and they are all taking place at once. Every reality has its own certain truth and validity for the particular person who is experiencing it and believes it to be true. With that in mind, the collective reality isn’t necessarily true or necessarily good, but that still doesn’t not make it a reality for many people.

Becoming conscious is witnessing what we don’t expect to see. It is empowering one’s self to choose to be the creator rather than the created…not the garden but the gardener. Imagine your mind as a garden and imagine everything else as a potential seed that is constantly bombarding your mind. Everything you focus your attention on becomes planted in your garden and begins to grow. It is the gardener’s job to cultivate the seeds which enter his garden, it is his job to pull the weeds and that which does not serve him. We have the power to manage our gardens as diligently as we choose. The more carefully we process the external world, the more creative we can become with our filters. We can choose any reality we desire, but that desire must be made conscious, and then, it must be put into action.

I came away from this san pedro experience feeling fresh and revitalized. Synchronicities have already begun to stack up. The future looks hopeful.

I challenge the individual to maintain and cultivate how we choose to see the world. Place yourself out of your expectations, breath consciously and with intent. The more I do this, the more I find that certain things really start to stand out. Individuals make eye contact and a conversation leads to synchronicity. Reality expands on many levels…

External perceptions abroad and the sitcom “Friends.”

I have been back from Ethiopia for just over 5 weeks now. I have begun to settle again into what I once thought of as normal and what I now think of as a damn interesting game of energy exchange.

This morning, I received this email from an Ethiopian priest, one of the first Ethiopians we met on our trip and one who overwhelmed us with his kindness and hospitality. An excerpt:

Dear Mike, I frankly, am in financial crisis at this moment. I ask for pardon for asking money in our first contact via email, please, understand ! if you could intervine no matter how little, if you were able to send some thing via Western union, it could help me to push a little bit and move around for mission appeal. Mike and Amy, I consider you as my real brothers and friends.

Before I received this email, I was able to count 3 Ethiopians who we met on our trip who did NOT ask us for money during anytime in our relationship. Father Goesh was among this small number.

———————————————————————-

There are several harsh realities we as travelers have to come to terms with.

Reality 1: our plane ticket to said country probably costs more than the majority of the people in that country earn in 5 years. (round trip ticket from Seattle to Ethiopia = $1,300)

Reality 2: the color of our skin tells people more about you than anything you could attempt to explain – whether it’s true or not

Reality 3: We get to go home at the end of the trip. They ARE home.

Anyone who has traveled to a more impoverished country than their own understands the challenges of being perceived as the financial savior sent from abroad. On any given day, it was common for us to be asked for money somewhere between 50-100 times in Ethiopia. This request was at times very serious, other times more like a kind of joke, while for others it was something that was taught to them by a parent, i.e. “When you see a ferenji, politely ask them for money and wait patiently until they give you some.”

So if we take the low estimate and multiply that by nine weeks, that means that we were asked for money roughly about 3,150 times during our stay in Ethiopia. There are obviously people you want to help and people that need help. But giving money to everyone is not practical.

A quick look at the average backpacker –

-Many of us have low paying jobs (if we are in fact employed),

-Most of us do not own our own home but are rather renting ($520 for a shared apartment in Seattle),

-Cost of food is considerably more in our own countries

-Does the average backpacker even have health insurance back home??

-Some of us have vehicles but after tacking on gas, insurance, parking, maintenance, etc….

-Entertainment is expensive ($3-$10 for a drink in a bar not to mention cover)

This is something that I have tried to explain to others abroad and I have been met by laughter and at times been called a liar. But the reality is, 1 out of 2 “backpackers” living in the United States between the ages of 18-28 would be considered to be living under the cultural economic standard of living.

Consider the fact that America is the largest soft product producer in the world. We export more culture than any other nation through a wide variety of media, and no matter where you are in the world, you can’t help but come across a coca-cola sign and a Brittany Spears poster.

Because of this, a lot of people in other countries think that wealth and comfort are simply benefits of living in America. I call it the “Friends” delusion. People across the world turn on the tv and watch an episode of Friends and can quite understandably assume that everyone in America is Caucasian, sits around and drinks coffee, doesn’t have a job, and has lots of money.

Anything that is considered “good” comes at the sacrifice of something that is also “good.” I highly recommend a documentary called “The Lost Boys of Sudan.” It follows five men orphaned by civil war who leave their huts one day and the next find themselves in Houston, Texas of all places, where they pursue the American dream only to discover that there “truly is no paradise on earth.” “No one in America has any friends,” one man tells a friend in Sudan over the phone. “I don’t have time to do anything.”

We travel to challenge who we are and to challenge our beliefs about the world at large. It is a two way street. Our perceptions about the world are just as subjective as the world’s perception about us. Our interactions with different individuals will result in different experiences for all involved. I may act pleasant with all I encounter, but not everyone will consider me to be a pleasant person. So is it more important to be perceived as pleasant or is it more important to believe yourself to be pleasant? Which truth is more true?

I am a firm advocator of challenging your beliefs and traveling is a good way to do this. Always remember, that once your beliefs have been challenged, you will hang in a limbo state as you restructure your views of reality. This may take a year, a month, or a moment. I have been able to do some major restructuring since my last trip abroad, but nothing permanent has been put in its place yet.